NaPoWriMo Day 27: Dead

Silence
Speaks the
Most powerful words

In response to, the optional prompt for NaPWriMo:

And today’s prompt – optional, as always — comes to us from Vince Gotera. It’s the hay(na)ku). Created by the poet Eileen Tabios and named by Vince, the hay(na)ku is a variant on the haiku. A hay(na)ku consists of a three-line stanza, where the first line has one word, the second line has two words, and the third line has three words.

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NaPoWriMo Day 26: All I know

I know the birds will never stop chirping
And, the breeze will always go on dancing
Like it did when I was with you
For all I know, this much is true.

I know that sapling is now a tree
I know that you are thinking of me
As a reflection of sky in oceans blue
For all I know, this much is true.

I know you never forgave yourself
And, I still have your ring on my shelf
The one, which you that day threw
For all I know, this much is true.

I know how I felt when we walked in rains
I still miss it, I walk the same lanes
And, once in a while, you must do too
For all I know, this much is true.

I know you cannot be there for me
I know, though, that you want to be
Together through the pains of life
For all I know, this will suffice.

NaPoWriMo Day 25: Batman

This poem is based on the following prompt:

And now for our prompt (optional, as always)! It’s the weekend, so I’d thought we might go with something short and just a bit (or a lot) silly – the Clerihew. These are rhymed, humorous quatrains involving a specific person’s name. You can write about celebrities, famous people from history, even your mom (hopefully she’s got a good name for rhyming with).

Batman or Bruce Wayne
He doesn’t feel any pain
His suit is black not red,
And, his parents are dead.

NaPoWriMo Day 24:Life Goes On

This poem is based on the following prompt:

Our prompt today (optional, as always), will hopefully provide you with a bit of Friday fun. Today, I challenge you to write a parody or satire based on a famous poem. It can be long or short, rhymed or not. But take a favorite (or unfavorite) poem of the past, and see if you can’t re-write it on humorous, mocking, or sharp-witted lines. You can use your poem to make fun of the original (in the vein of a parody), or turn the form and manner of the original into a vehicle for making points about something else (more of a satire – though the dividing lines get rather confused and thin at times).

“Life goes on”
He used to say it.
Despite everything, it goes on.
He used to shout it.
But, does it really?
You’re 28
And, you have no job
Your lover promised you love,
And, since is gone.
You have no friends,
And, your efforts are vain
You are alive,
But, living is pain.
But, sure,
Life goes no.
Is it life?

NaPoWriMo Day 23: The Letter O

This poem is based on the NaPoWriMo Prompt for day 23:

And now for today’s prompt (optional, as always). Today, I challenge you to take a chance, literally. Find a deck of cards (regular playing cards, tarot cards, uno cards, cards from your “Cards Against Humanity” deck – whatever), shuffle it, and take a card – any card! Now, begin free-writing based on the card you’ve chosen. Keep going without stopping for five minutes

I got the letter O from Scrabble. Here it goes:

O
The first word
That comes to my mind
Okay.
She would say
“I hate it
When you use
Okay.
When you say
Okay.
When you type
Okay.
As a reply.
And, especially,
When you put
A full stop at the end.
Is that all?
You don’t have
Anything else
To say?
Something more poetic?
Something more romantic?
Something more funny?
Something more lovable?
I hate it
When you type okay”
And I would reply,
In the most poetic
In the most romantic
In the most funny
In the most lovable
Manner, words, feelings
“Okay.”

 

NaPoWriMo Day 21: Erasure

This poem is a response to the NaPoWriMo prompt for Day 21.

Our prompt for today (optional, as always) is an old favorite – the erasure! This involves taking a pre-existing text and blacking out or erasing words, while leaving the placement of the remaining words intact.

I have taken the first page of the book “Shadow of the Wind” by Carlos Ruiz Zaffon:

I still remember the day my father took me to the Cemetery
of Forgotten Books for the first time. It was the early
summer of 1945, and we walked through the streets of a
Barcelona trapped beneath ashen skies as dawn poured over
Rambla de Santa Monica in a wreath of liquid copper.
‘Daniel, you mustn’t tell anyone what you’re about to see
today,’ my father warned. ‘Not even your friend Tomas. No
one.’
‘Not even Mummy?’
My father sighed, hiding behind the sad smile that
followed him like a shadow all through his life.
‘Of course you can tell her,’ he answered, heavyhearted.
‘We keep no secrets from her. You can tell her everything.’
Shortly after the Civil War, an outbreak of cholera had
taken my mother away. We buried her in Montjuic on my fourth
birthday. The only thing I can recall is that it rained all
day and all night, and that when I asked my father whether
heaven was crying, he couldn’t bring himself to reply. Six
years later my mother’s absence remained in the air around
us, a deafening silence that I had not yet learned to stifle
with words. My father and I lived in a modest apartment on
Calle Santa Ana, a stone’s throw from the church square. The
apartment was directly above the bookshop, a legacy from my
grandfather, that specialized in rare collectors’ editions
and secondhand books – an enchanted bazaar, which my father
hoped would one day be mine.

NaPoWriMo Day 20: Still

No,
The world did not stop
When you went away.

The trains still come and go
Plants still wither and grow
The birds still fly in peace
The buildings still outshine the trees.

The river never stopped to rest
The sun still sets in west
People still shout and cry
Innocent souls still do die.
Still do die.
They still do die.

The world did not stop
When you went away
I did.

The world did not stop
When you went away
I wish it had not.

NaPoWriMo Day 18: The Beginning of a Poem

Before all the lying verses
All the wounds and all the nurses

Before all the bizarre lines
And, the outbreak of bullets and mines

Before all the chaotic words
And, the debauching swearing curse

Before the letters that made it all
Before the erection of that wall.

There was just me
And, there was just you.
And, there was peace.